DSCF0134.JPG

ENVIRONMENTAL

IMPACT

Formas e iconos Ha4-05.png

DEFORESTATION-THE NEED FOR ALTERNATIVES

Vulnerable communities in the Amazon Rainforest and other rural areas see no other alternatives but to extract resources to make a living.

 

 

Logging, extraction of oil and minerals, cattle ranching, and the use of monoculture crops are widespread ways to make a living in Ecuador and other countries of the Global South.

A large amount of deforested patches are visible from satellite

Napo , Ecuador

MAPA DEFORESTED.png

MONOCULTURE CROPS

LOGGING

PASTURES

OIL RIGS

MONOCULTURE FORESTS

RESTORATION, CONSERVATION & REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE

By joining Humans for Abundance, our restorers find an alternative and more sustainable way to make a living.

The eco-actions they perform restore their soils and bring back biodiversity to their lands.

Restoring soils and forests sinks carbon from the atmosphere into the ground.

Conserving primary forests prevents more carbon from being released into the atmosphere.

Our restorers do important work for all of us under these categories:

WhatsApp Image 2021-09-29 at 15.49.15.jpeg

RESTORATION

Restorers regenerate soils and forests by planting, caring and monitoring the growth of seedlings

WhatsApp Image 2021-10-12 at 16.09.16 (3).jpeg

CONSERVATION

Restorers make a living by monitoring and caring for forests and all their inhabitants, including old-growth trees

Rogelio portada.png

REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE

Restorers make a living by applying and teaching permaculture and other regenerative agriculture methods

ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION

Regenerating a degraded habitat back to its former trajectory is possible. It only needs the the right resources and the commitment of hard-working locals.

Land in the process of restoration in the Amazon Rainforest sequesters xx TONNES OF CARBON

per hectare per year.

from pasture to forest.png

Before being a biodiverse forest, Omar Tello's land had pastures for cows.

biodiversity.png

Today, it houses a great variety of plants and animals. In return, the restored forest provides seeds for further restoration in other lands.

from forest to seedling.png

The seedlings go to local communities that are joining the restoration movement.

WhatsApp Image 2021-10-14 at 5.52.56 AM (3).jpeg

7500+

trees planted by our restorers during our pilot project

(2020 - 2021)

200+

hectares under restoration process during our pilot project

(2020 - 2021)

CONSERVATION OF KEY AREAS

The reserves our restorers protect contain some of the most diverse and most scientifically important forests in the world. 

Some of these areas have more biodiversity than many entire countries and more unique locally-endemic plant species than in all of the world-famous Galápagos Islands.

Olivier.jpeg
WhatsApp Image 2021-10-16 at 10.20.51.jpeg

Andean Danta or Danta de páramo (Tapirus pinchaque) - photo taken by camera trap set up by Juan Pablo  Reyes

Their habitats house many endangered species of Andean mammals and birds like the spectacled bear, the black and chestnut eagle or the mountain tapirs.

 

These species are key for the health of these forests and the local families need resources to keep them protected from hunters, loggers, illegal orchid collectors, and cow ranchers who invade these reserves to plant grass.

DSCF0031.JPG
DSCF1671.JPG
DSCF0097.JPG
1534305192242.jpg.jpg
DSCF0063.JPG

Many frog species found in Omar Tello's forest - photos taken by Omar Tello

Hunters travel long distances to kill woolly monkeys in this area as they provide a lot of meat.

 These forests have been so well protected that they are no longer afraid of humans. This is why it is possible to take such close-up pictures.  Their numbers are increasing!

Woolly monkey
Woolly Monkey P1050596.tif

Woolly monkeys photographed by Santiago and Fausto Recalde 

5000+

hectares of Andean and Amazon forests protected since 1980

SCIENCE-BASED

ECO-ACTIONS

The eco-actions our restorers offer promote these benefits for the environment

RECOVERY OF ENDANGERED AND ENDEMIC PLANTS

We plant tree species that exist only within the area and are endangered according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the Red Book of Endemic Plants of Ecuador. With the planting of native and endangered species we are avoiding the disappearance of species in the forest and keeping the balance in the ecosystem. 

SUSTAINING ENDANGERED AND ENDEMIC WILD ANIMAL POPULATIONS

We seek to generate forest areas that are connected to each other or function as ecological corridors, so that animals can move between forested areas, have more available habitat and have greater genetic population variability. There are animals in this region that are critically endangered, such as the jaguar (Panthera onca) that have a life range of up to 309.7 km2, and if they do not have a large area of forest, it is highly probable that they will become locally extinct in the near future. Protecting their habitats is fundamental. 

BUFFER AREA MAINTENANCE

We restore disturbed areas near national parks or ecological reserves, which help neutralize the effects of human intervention. In this way, we ensure the effectiveness of ecological protection within these parks or reserves that act as source areas for healthy and genetically diverse populations of flora and fauna.

PROTECTION OF CENTENNIAL TREES

We protect old trees or "mother trees". A 35-year-old tree can capture up to one ton of CO₂ per year. In addition, old trees, besides being the refuge of a large number of species of flora and fauna, have an important role in the ecosystem. They help maintain ecological processes within the forest, such as hydrological regimes and nutrient cycles. By keeping these trees alive we are allowing the correct functioning of the ecological processes of the forest.

CARBON STORAGE AND SEQUESTRATION

By planting trees we contribute to a greater capacity to absorb excess CO₂ emitted into the atmosphere. This is vital to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. The greater the number of large trees on the planet, the more carbon will be captured and contained. In addition, by protecting remaining areas of forest, we are recovering biomass, thereby increasing the rate of carbon sequestration, and preventing the release of carbon as a result of logging.

PROTECTION OF NEW SPECIES POTENTIALLY BENEFICIAL TO HUMANITY

Many regions of Ecuador are characterized by their endemism, that is, there are species that only exist in these parts of the world, and have not yet been described by science. The plants of the tropical forests are rich in secondary metabolites, such as alkaloids, which have proven to have a high medicinal value. By conserving the native forests of this region, we are saving species that can be of potential use to humans as a medicinal source.

CREATE MORE POSITIVE IMPACT!

Do more than recycle and reuse.

BE THE SOURCE OF ABUNDANCE

We take care of the rest.